10 February 2012 - Needles

posted 10th Feb 2012, 5:13 AM

10 February 2012 - Needles
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10th Feb 2012, 5:13 AM

Lich_Barrister

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So Mackers is finally aware of the fact that when you deal with the forces of darkness, the answers that you get may often not be given to you straight. Birnam Wood? Of woman born? Played and played, my man.

So why play through? You know what the ending's supposed to be for you, so why fight and lose? You won't likely survive the aftermath of the fight, but you'll remain unvanquished on the battlefield - especially as you face the man who's fated to beat you.

But what if you have to deal with the aftermath and be humiliated in a consistent manner... well, that's entirely different. Macduff probably hasn't the slightest clue on this point, but there's one thing that he wants more than anything else and that is to kill Macbeth and to satisfy his vengeance.

So put the gears to him. Find his weak point, and press. It doesn't take much, really. Is it that Macbeth isn't that clever? That he really doesn't want to surrender, even once? Or is it just the culmination of a tragic character? Take your pick, combine them, whatever: Macduff gets his shot.

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10th Feb 2012, 5:41 AM

BrickVoid

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Typo in first panel, second word balloon: "that palter with us in a double sense" :D

As for Macbeth, I reckon he wants a fight and that he has to have his ego ramped up before he'll fight!

" 'Twas not a man there who'd fight without just cause" is how I'm reading it, and I suspect Macbeth would not care for an opponent who wouldn't goad his ego before fighting him! :D

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10th Feb 2012, 6:53 AM

Capt. Redstorm

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In the words of Harvey Dent "You either die a hero, or you live long enough to see yourself become the villain." Or in Macbeth's case, he he does get to die, just not as a hero. lol.

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11th Feb 2012, 4:37 PM

Lich_Barrister

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Actually, palter is the right word. It's like double-talk or equivocating. It's just a very archaic word.

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